It’s Book Giveaway Time! One ARC of THE GOOD NEIGHBOR is up for grabs!

In honor of a long-awaited, family weekend with both of my kids and my parents (something that hasn’t happened in about a year and a half) I’m giving away ONE of my precious ARCs (Advance Reading Copies) of THE GOOD NEIGHBOR, which officially lands on readers’ doorsteps on October 13, 2015!

ARC TGN

This way I know I can keep you all busy entering and tweeting! I don’t want you getting into any trouble while I’m gone. 😉

The only thing you have to do is tell me in the comments about your favorite neighbor growing up. (The rest of the entry options are not mandatory.)

When you read THE GOOD NEIGHBOR you’ll meet Izzy Lane, who moves back to her childhood home with her five-year-old son, and right next door to Mrs. Feldman, the woman who has been her surrogate grandmother as long as she can remember. The tables turn a bit as Izzy begins to see she can help Mrs. Feldman as a thanks for all the help she’s given Izzy her whole life.

I wrote this book for many reasons (more blog posts on those as pub day nears) but one was to pay homage to the Northeast Philadelphia street I lived on for 19 years — from the age of 5 until I married and moved away at 26. I didn’t want to write a book set in the 1970s (too much research for me, bowing down to my histfic writing pals) but I did want Izzy to have the same kind of memories I had, the same kind of affection for her city street and neighborhood. And she does.

Philadelphia is a city of neighborhoods, and I am a proud product of one of them. Many neighbors fill my memories, and I’m not silly enough to name a favorite when they all hold a special place in my heart. I’ll write more about my real neighborhood (not Izzy’s, as that is a reimagined cluster of many neighborhoods I know) another time!

Have fun with the giveaway and good luck!

Amy xo

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44 thoughts on “It’s Book Giveaway Time! One ARC of THE GOOD NEIGHBOR is up for grabs!

  1. When I was young I had a neighbor who had down syndrome and he was very kind and genuine. He always smiled and greeted everyone. After we moved, I never saw him again.

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  2. My favorite neighbor lived quite a walk up the road. We lived in a country setting, and the Rhegg’s farmed their large property. There were three sisters and one brother. One of the sisters worked in the city and everyone else tended to the crops and the animals. Since none of them had children, my five siblings and I became their surrogate children, or perhaps more like their grandchildren. We would walk to their house to pick up my mom’s order of produce and eggs. They would keep us quite awhile, as they told us stories of their youth, asked about school or play, and plied us with home baked treats. These four wonderful people taught us about farm life, and loving animals, and each other. Though they’ve been gone for years, I still think of them nearly every day. Their influence and the love they gave to six little children lives on.

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  3. Arman and Betty Clement. They lived next door to me until I was five, and for me to still remember how amazing they were is a miracle!! They had three daughters who babysat me, a son-in-law with a motorcycle and my sister and I were included in one of the daughter’s weddings.I’m still in touch with them! Wonderful people!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. My favorite neighbor growing up was my friend Lynn, who was my age. We didn’t hang out much at school, but in the off-time, we had fun. We still see each other occasionally and do some “remember whens.”

    Liked by 1 person

  5. The Knopp’s were our most interesting neighbors. They had 3 boys and a girl, who seemed to always be fighting or getting in trouble, and they had springer spaniels and grew rows of gladiolas in their backyard, which they sold at the roadside. VERY different from my family. And the boys owned every Star Wars toy ever made.

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  6. My favorite neighbor was my friend Karen Paine. At age seven, we were plotting and telling secrets. I also had a crush on her brother, whom I remember chasing through the woods several times.

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  7. I grew up in Philadelphia and had lots and lots of neighbors. One in particular I remember was Jeanny. I lived in her house more than my own and we got into all kinds of mischievous. Spilled ink on her mother’s carpet, lots of trouble for that one and sliding down “dead man’s hill”, which I’m sure if I saw it today it would just be a bump. Getting ice from the milk truck, lol. On and on the stories go. Those were the days!!

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  8. A teenage girl moved in to the neighborhood when I was 9 .she was lovely I really looked up to her.one of the most exciting things about her she loved to read had a large library&loved to share books with me.

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  9. My favorite neighbors were around my age and lived through the woods. We created a “mailbox” out in the woods between our houses and would dart back and forth to our special place at random moments, leaving notes for each other beneath an old pine tree. We’re all grown up now, but part of me wonders if there’s still a note or two in that cleaned-out mayonnaise jar at the foot of the tree. Thanks for the opportunity to reminisce!

    The new book looks beautiful, by the way–great color scheme!

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  10. Had a friend (Connie) who lived nearby. She did not have my mother’s stamp of approval. Before reading further, bear in mind that this was the 60s. Social mores were different. Her parents were divorced (horror!), her mother worked (double horror!) and there were 5 kids (who’s watching the children?) and my mother told me I couldn’t hang out with her anymore. I was devastated. I told Connie and Connie told her mom, who confronted my mom. “Who the hell do you think you are?” Not a pleasant memory, but Connie was a good friend. I think I may have just created a scene for some future book. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I have had some of the same neighbors that I grew up all of my life. Their kids and I are the same age and it’s wonderful that we all have been very close.

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  12. I’m still close with my neighbor who lived two doors down from me and has the same first name. We lost touch for a while but reconnected on Facebook and now we blog together at CLC. She’s so sweet and wonderful!

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  13. Paul and Alice were an older couple next door. They didn’t have children but they let my brother and I play in their yard, help in the garden and watch Paul work on all kinds of stuff. They were like an extra set of grandparents to us. Beautiful couple!

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  14. My favorite neighbor was the mom of four boys I grew up playing with. They had a huge yard and my brother and I played there quite a bit. Since she didn’t have any daughters and I had no sisters, I think we enjoyed each other’s company when we needed a little break from the boys. My mom liked her a lot, too, so she had no problem with me hanging out at their house every so often. She was always very kind to me and welcomed me into her home! Sadly, she passed away from breast cancer when I was in high school.

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  15. My favorite neighbors, one a male and one a female were Kim and Amy. We grew up on the same street in the suburbs of Mansfield, OH. I was a bit of a tomboy and Kim and I used to take my Barbie’s and his GI Joes and have them go on adventures in our backyards. We used to pull each other wildly in his wagon, up and down the rows of his dad’s garden, always careful not to crash into his prize tomato plants. Amy and I were always in and out of each other’s houses, no matter the season. We both still recall the fun we had making a tin can telephone with the string hanging between our 2 upstairs bedrooms.

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  16. In 1969, when neighbors with kids rumored to be your age moved in, it was customary to go over and introduce yourself and ask if they could come out and play. One overcast November Sunday, I walked across the muddy ravine which during the summer was the lake we lived on, now drained for the winter. I knocked on the door of a spreading ranch with a sign that said “Whispering Pines” and a beautiful girl with shoulder length wavy blond hair like a 1950s movie star answered and greeted me with a big smile. She looked too young to be a Mom, I thought she was a babysitter. A little boy clung to her legs behind and peeked out to see me. This was the fabulous woman who all of us eventually called “Aunt Joan” and she was not the teenager she looked like, but 31 years old.

    Her daughter Linda was the exact opposite in looks and style of execution. Her straight blond hair was tomboy short, she immediately asked me a number of questions to see where we “stacked up” in relation to each other. At just turned ten, I was nearly a year younger than her as she turned eleven in March. I had all A’s and one B the last term. She was a straight A student. She showed me the dent in her head where her mother had whacked her with a hair brush for being bad (at eighteen months.) She told me of her many accidents, flying off of a bike and fracturing her eye socket, breaking her wrist and collarbone and spraining her ankle. She was sanguine about all these adventures.

    Linda was a great athlete, and would ice skate backwards at 100 miles an hour, playing hockey with the neighborhood boys. She was on all the sports teams at school, and was class vice president and homecoming queen. It used to drive me crazy, a bit, that she was so good at everything, got the highest grades without even seeming to try. She was also voted class clown in the girls department and was truly, the most fun person I ever met — till my husband! We lived together in NY for a year, in Brooklyn, as we were both launching our journalism careers.

    The neighborhood I grew up in has gone from being one filled with rambunctious dogs and kids playing soft ball in the street, a lake full of noise, rafts, shouting, sailboats and cocktail parties — to something close to a gated community full of uptight rich people. But Linda’s parents are still in the same home, and, as ever, they leave their garage door open, a sign of welcome to any neighbors in need of a chat.

    Thank God for good neighbors!

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  17. I had many favorite neighbors, but I’ll pick Mrs. Hanke who lived right next to us. My mother was a widow who initially worked at home, but when she went downtown (Chicago) to a real job, I was in charge and in 7th grade. Mrs. Hanke watched over me and my younger brother–sometimes she was annoying, but we knew she had the best intentions and our safe welfare at heart. When I got married, her big old Oldsmobile was the car I rode in to church.

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  18. One of my friends from school was my neighbor and shared a garden between our houses. We still are friends even though I moved.

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  19. My favorite neighbor growing up was definitely my kindergarten teacher, who made me feel like a rock star just because I learned to read, and doled out books as fast as I could go through them. We lived in Virginia, and I’d ride my bike to her house, arriving with bangs plastered to my forehead with sweat, and come home with a new book in my basket every time.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. When I was in fifth grade my parents moved us to an uninsulated one room cabin out in the boonies of New York State. The place had no running water, and so we would take waist-high old fashioned metal milk cans and empty bleach bottles to our nearest neighbor, an old man named Charlie Parker. Charlie lived in a ramshackle farmhouse, towering with “treasures” he’d picked from the nearby dump, and surrounded by chickens, ducks, and a collection of hound dogs. He taught my dad how to cook bannock bread in a cast iron skillet over a fire, and he let us fill our water receptacles from the hand pump which sprouted from the hard-packed dirt of his front yard.

    I wish I’d been older when we lived there. I would have loved to have spent time harvesting his wisdom.

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  21. My favorite neighbor was my friend Melanie. She lived the next street over and we rode bikes, had sleepovers, roller skated and hung out with or without my brothers. Then one sad day her family moved and I was heartbroken. We are now reaquainted on Facebook. She lives just 30 minutes from me and we plan on getting together very soon.

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  22. My favorite neighbor was my cousin. We lived in a tiny town in Upstate NY and there was never anything fun to do so we improvised as we went. Generally that meant she would convince me to do crazy things that might just get me killed, but it always seemed to work out in the end. We were kids, reckless, a little wild, and having the time of our lives. Until I moved away to live with my mom. It was never quite the same after that, but we still saw each other in the summers and for holidays. Just enough time to get in a little more trouble. 😉

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  23. My favorite neighbor moved away a couple of years ago, which really saddened us. Mary was always very generous, giving us fresh cherry tomatoes, a piece of her sunflower plant to transplant, or a friendly piece of advice. Our small dogs were through-the-fence best friends!

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  24. I grew up in suburban Detroit in the 50s. Everyone had big families and in my half of our block there were 10 – 12 kids my age. Of course, we didn’t play with the boys when we were younger so I had 6 girls my age to play with. My favorite neighbor was Ellen. She lived 5 houses away and we spent as much time together as we could. We were both the oldest and had two younger brothers who we thought were terrible pests. We played with Barbies and spent all available time together when we weren’t at school. We were great friends until she moved away at age 15 and even then we stayed in touch (this was way before email and facebook). We remained good friends until she died in a car accident when we were 18. I still think of her frequently.

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  25. I not only moved a lot, but grew up in the country where having a close neighbor wasn’t common. But my best friends in high school lived down the gravel road from me, close enough to walk if I had to, although I’d usually ride my horse. We’d ride together, pick blackberries (towering bushes along the RR tracks in Oregon), or leave the horses tied and play with their lambs or clean bedrooms with each other. We’d trade books constantly, talk about boys and practice makeup. Good friends, still keep in touch.

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  26. My favorite neighbor growing up was Mrs. Wickes! When I would go over and visit her house, she always let me play with her collection of toys she received from McDonalds. She always had a tin filled with candy of all sorts readily available. I recently found out she in a nursing home with dementia. It is hard to see people you knew growing up, that has a disease where they don’t know you anymore.

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  27. My favorite neighbor was a girl who was (we unfortunately don’t seem to talk anymore) one of my best friends for years growing up. Her house was like my second home and mine was to hers. Her mom was like a second mom to me. I loved having a friend this close because as an only child I didn’t have that many friends to play with.

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  28. I had so many growing up. I lived beside my grandmother and I also had an Aunt and Uncle that loved reading and pottery. That’s where I
    got my love of reading from. She showed me how to do pottery and paint by numbers. My Uncle could make every sound for all the birds that flew around our houses. My Other Aunt lived beside my grandmother. She showed all of us how to make a garden so that’s where we all got to learn how to plant a garden. My grandmother showed us all about love. Plus we had ducks and she would set on her porch and feed them they would walk right up to her and be hand fed food. We were all surrounded by love with all of them there for us all.

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  29. My favorite neighbor was across the street from us. she still is. My friend lived there and we rode our horses together. We are still friends, mostly on facebook as we live far from each other now. They were all great friends with my family.

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  30. My mom’s best friend lived just behind us. She cut my hair my whole life until I moved to college. She was a single mom and I always thought she was so cool. Even though she was close with my mom, I confided in her with all my secrets and to this day, I’m not sure if she ever told. Once, at a party on the last day of school my Jr. year, someone spilt beer all over me (I wasn’t drinking). I went to Karen’s house and stayed there while she washed and dried my clothes so I wouldn’t get into trouble. â˜ș

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  31. My favorite neighbors growing up were Mr. and Mrs. Anderson and their children Reta and Bobby. Actually, they were my parents’ neighbors even before I was born. But while growing up, they always mailed me books for Christmas and birthdays: The Bobbsey Twins, The Happy Hollisters. Bobby was the architect when we built a home when I was 10 years old. When I started college, Reta was my English 101 teacher.

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  32. The Perrys were our neighbors. Their kids bustled and sang and Danny was my brother’s right hand. His sister was a cupcake—all sweet and pretty (of course everything I wasn’t). I loved their house because they had actual multiple steps that went up to their front door—unlike our one step cement rise. Mrs. Perry was warm, a lot of fun, and became my mom’s life experience sharing pal. We ran all over each other’s yards, climbed each other’s trees, broke each other’s windows, and always stayed for dinner. That was my ’60’s growing up foundation on my street in Dewitt, New York!

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  33. I’ll always remember my best friend Debbie and her mother let me come over when my parents were fighting – and that was a lot and all hours. As a teenage girl, they were my Angels.

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  34. My favorite neighbor lived across the street from me on the west side of Chicago. She was two years younger than me and when she and I were running down the block one day, she accidentally ran her mouth right into my elbow while trying to catch up. When she did, my elbow unfortunately knocked out one of her front teeth and she went home crying. Her mom told her she could’t play with me any more because I was a lot taller and rougher. Or something like that. Years later she was my maid of honor when I got married. Well, that incident was over 64 years ago and we still are, always have been and always will be best friends. We see each other often and have vacationed together frequently. I would have missed a wonderful friendship if she had obeyed her mother!!

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