Guest Post: Author Kathryn Craft Asks “Are Likable Characters Important In Women’s Fiction?”

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EDITED TO ADD: THERE’S A GREAT CONVERSATION GOING ON IN THE COMMENTS! CHECK IT OUT!

Today on WFW, my friend, author Kathryn Craft, poses a question that has attracted a lot of attention in recent writerly media. IS IT IMPORTANT TO HAVE LIKABLE CHARACTERS? Even moreso, in women’s fiction (because that’s why we’re here) is it important for you to wish you could be friends with the characters in the book? This is a question I know the answer to for me. It’s not imperative — but my favorite books always end up being the ones I wish I could step inside, that I wish didn’t end, and the ones where I wish I could have coffee with the main character. That doesn’t mean the book has to be always happy or offer an HEA ending, it just means I have to like the main character and wish I could know her better. I also have loved some books where this isn’t the case, but when I think back on old and new favorites, that’s the prevalent theme. I’ll share some of my personal list in the comments. 

Below, you’ll learn Kathryn thoughts on the subject (a little different from my own), as well as about her new, compelling book, THE FAR END OF HAPPY, which was inspired by real-life events. Kathryn is a brave and talented author. And a real advocate for her author friends (I should know). 

Please welcome Kathryn Craft to WFW—and share your thoughts and favorite women’s fiction books in the comments!

Amy xo

Do You Seek Friends in Women’s Fiction?

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Guest Post: Author Lindsey J. Palmer Writes About Living In New York City And Major Life Milestones In Her New Novel

If We Lived HereToday, author Lindsey J. Palmer poses a foreboding question: how do we—and our characters—handle major life changes? How about those milestone birthdays? (You know the ones.)In Lindsey’s newest novel, IF WE LIVED HERE, the main character, Emma, is on the cusp of turning thirty. How does Emma cope? You’ll have to read the book to find out!

I have to admit that what impressed me even more than the premise (and I love books set in NYC because I love NYC) was the fact that Lindsey was writing her second published novel before she turned thirty. 

My debut was published in 2013 when I was forty-nine. When I was thirty I had a two-year-old and lived in an early nineteen-twenties Cape Cod in New Jersey. I had the picket fence, both literally and figuratively. Times have changed. 

And I think that’s what IF WE LIVED HERE is about. Changing times. Adapting. Figuring things out along the way. Making it work. Living life. 

I can totally relate. Even if when I was thirty, there was no computer in my house, telephones were attached to walls, stamps cost twenty-nine cents—and people still used stamps.

Please welcome Lindsey J. Palmer back to WFW!

Amy xo

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Guest Post: Author Susan Örnbratt Asks: “What is a lucky writer?”

Cover for websiteHere is a lovely reminder from author Susan Örnbratt that we should find inspiration in the everyday as well as in the extraordinary. And, that sometimes things happen just when they should. Even if it’s ten years later. Please welcome Susan to Women’s Fiction Writers!

Amy xo

How a Grandmother’s Secret Words Became a Granddaughter’s Treasure 

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Guest Post: Author Kellie Coates Gilbert Shares Her Pulpwood Queen Weekend With Women’s Fiction Writers

Today we have a special treat! Step into the world of the Annual Pulpwood Queens’ Girlfriend Weekend with author Kellie Coates Gilbert! It’s an event filled with authors and readers. Have you been there as either? Share your experience in the comments. Look fun to you? Let us know what you think! 

And please welcome Kellie Coates Gilbert back to Women’s Fiction Writers!

Amy xo

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Guest Post: When Is It Time To Consider Yourself A Real Writer?

Med_you'llbethinkingofme2_505x825It’s a new year. Do you have the same old attitude? Is it time for a shift?

Are you struggling with whether you’re a real writer? A novelist? An author? Read author Densie Webb’s (and no, it’s not Denise, it’s Densie) account of how bad she had to feel in order to get a place where she could feel better. Many of us have been there. I feel like I’ve known Densie FOREVER, and it’s great to feature her here today, and to celebrate the release of her debut novel, YOU’LL BE THINKING OF ME. 

 And to answer the question “When is it time to consider yourself a real writer?” I’d say: Any time you damn well please.

But that’s just me. ;-)

Please welcome Densie to Women’s Fiction Writers and share your stories in the comments.

Amy xo

When Is It Time To Consider Yourself A Real Writer?

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Guest Post: Author Sonia Taitz’s Long, Winding, And Inspiring Road To Publication

DOWN UNDERIt’s December! Are you slowing down or gearing up? Are you taking inventory of what you’ve accomplished this year or what you’ve neglected? I’d say that amidst the cookies and presents, it’s time to (at the very least) remember that there are many ways to meet (or exceed) writing goals. Sometimes one good, solid paragraph is a major accomplishment. Sometimes it’s a word count. Sometimes it’s simply untangling a plot knot in your head. No matter what, it’s always good to get a little inspiration—and that’s what I offer you today with the introduction of author Sonia Taitz, and her interesting road to the publication of her three novels. 

Sonia is honest and funny—key components of author sanity in my opinion.

Please welcome Sonia to Women’s Fiction Writers! 

Amy xo

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Guest Post: Author Greer Macallister Ponders The Mystery Of Historical Fiction

TML coverToday, author Greer Macallister tackles the age-old question of genre! Historical fiction, women’s fiction, romance. Does it matter? How do we fit? What does it mean? I’m not sure there are any definite answers, but Greer has it right. It’s the reader who matters, and our job is to deliver a good story. THAT’S what’s most important, no matter when, where, or how, your story exists.

Please welcome Greer Macallister to Women’s Fiction Writers!

Amy xo

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